Stop 4 – Annette Street Baptist Church

Annette Street and High Park Avenue

Annette Street Baptist Church circa 1890, NE corner High park Avenue
Source: Baldwin Room Metro Tor. Ref. Lib. Acc B6-45b repro T 10573

200 Annette Street, Czechoslovakian Baptist Church, looking  northeast from Annette Street. Photographer Barbara Hotson. Source WTJHS, date acquired April 1998

The Annette Street Baptist Church is comparatively smaller compared to the other nearby churches, and reflects not only the Baptists’ preference for less ornate structures, but also the working class worshippers who made up its congregation.

Architectural Notes:

  • from the photos it is possible to see that the original building was more than doubled in length in 1906 when the western entrance was created reflecting the congregation’s growth in size and influence
  • the east end of the building is the original building and can be identified by the more “orange” colour of the brick
  • the tall narrow round-arched windows are romanesque in appearance but when combined with the tall steeply pitched tower roof and main roof evoke a north german / middle european appearance typical of late medieval times

High Park-Alhambra United Church

260 High Park Ave., High Park Alhambra United Church.  Photographer Larry Burak. Source WTJHS. Date acquired July 1995

260 High Park Ave. Built 1919 southwest corner Annette St., High Park Alhambra United Church, window detail, photographer Ron Stagg. Source Humberside Heritage District Project.  Date acquired 1980

260 High Park Avenue. High Park Alhambra United Church. North side. Photographer John Huzil.  Source Heritage Toronto Project. Date acquired July 1995

High Park-Alhambra United Church, built as a Methodist Church, is important due to the Methodists’ role in having the sale of alcohol banned in the Junction for nearly a century. It was here that the local reverend called the Junction’s hotels “cesspools of harlotry, vice, and iniquity.”

Architectural Notes:

  • similarities to the Victoria-Royce Church are the tall bell tower and the cross pattern to the main worship space, with the ancillary spaces to the rear of the property
  • the architectural style is a tudor revival crossed with a gothic revivial, quite often seen in high schools built in the same decade (1919) in the city (Jarvis, Harbord, Western Tech., etc.)
  • martial features in a church – arrow slot windows on the tower, crenellations at the top of the tower
  • main windows have three major divisions with the centre division itself sub-divided into three sections

On to Stop 5

Home, Please

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